Next performance:
November 1
St. James Church Malden
Surrey, UK
Click here for more information & dates


       

Reviews

“[Schwarz] caught the terse, dusty sound of the piece (Stravinsky’s L’Histoire du Soldat) and made easy work of the shifting meters and rhythmic spring to the music”
--The Philadelphia Inquirer

“Violinist Timothy Schwarz gave a stunning performance of Sametz’s “Fantasia on Lama bada yatathanna,” based on a well-known traditional Arabic tune and combining Middle Eastern techniques with traditional Western styles.”
--Morning Call (Bethlehem, PA)

“Schwarz and Charity Wicks give one of the very best readings of the Bartók Sonata I have ever heard. They have obviously given the work a good deal of thought, and this is good enough to be the only recording of this work in your collection if you just want one.”
“Pleasantly exuberant and tender as required”
“Intense performance… Emotionally convincing”
--American Record Guide

“Superb playing of the Brahms Double Concerto in A Minor with the Rome Symphony Orchestra. Throughout it was absolutely clear that Schwarz and Stomberg were of one mind about the character of the piece. They agreed beautifully on the unity of the lovely unison romantic line of the second movement, and the final movement was just as titled, a lively, energetic Vivace non troppo.”
--Rome News Tribune

“Performed with a baroque bow, his Bach [Concerto No. 1 in A minor] was tasteful and idiomatic, with selective (or no) vibrato and meticulous intonation. He switched gears in the Tchaikovsky [Violin Concerto] warhorse, where he demonstrated a solid technique and considerable flair.”
--Music in Cincinnati

“Schwarz turned out to be the afternoon’s principal purveyor of romance in a strong account of Ernest Chausson’s voluptuous miniature “Poème”. The young violinist’s tone, which is silvery and consistent from top to bottom, was admirably suited to both solo passages and interactions with Chausson’s darker orchestration.”
--Richmond Times

“I have no reservations whatsoever about the ensemble’s performance of the Barber string quartet. The Serafins are less driven than the Emerson Quartet, and their more flexible tempo allows the Brahmsian pathos of this work to shine through. Violinist Timothy Schwarz’s and cellist Lawrence Stomberg’s contributions in the Molto Adagio—most often heard in the arrangement known as the Adagio for Strings—deserve special note.”
--Fanfare Magazine